Workplace Law Blog
Knowledge Centre

BC court upholds termination clause in employment contract   

May 15, 2023

In Forbes v. Glenmore Printing Ltd., 2023 BCSC 25, the Supreme Court of BC had to consider the validity of a termination clause in an employment contract. In this case, the terminated employee was arguing that the termination clause was invalid and therefore he was entitled to reasonable notice at common law. 

The employee argued the termination clause was invalid because it only required notice or payment of lieu that matched the individual termination provisions in section 63 of the Employment Standards Act (ESA).  Specifically, the termination clause said:

[the employer] may terminate this Agreement by giving the Employee,

(a)  After the first three months of continuous employment, one week’s notice or wages,

(b)  After the first year of continuous employment, two weeks’ notice or wages, and

(c)   After three consecutive years of employment three weeks’ notice or wages, plus one additional week’s notice or wages for each additional year of employment to a maximum of eight weeks’ notice or wages.

The employee argued that this clause potentially violated the ESA because it did not account for the possibility that he could be terminated pursuant to the group termination provisions in section 64 of the ESA.  Those provisions in section 64 required additional notice or payment in lieu of notice in certain circumstances of group terminations. 

The court first concluded that section 63 (the individual termination requirements) established the statutory minimum requirements that are needed for an employer to avoid the common law entitlement to reasonable notice. 

The court next concluded that the termination clause did not say that the employee would not receive his statutory entitlement in circumstances other than in section 63.  The court concluded that the employer was still bound by the group termination requirements in section 64, so the clause was not going to breach the ESA.  This was an important difference when compared to other cases relied on by the employee, where a potential future breach of the ESA rendered a clause invalid. 

In the result, the court dismissed the case against the employer, and ordered that the employee to pay costs to the employer.  

Key Takeaway

Employers should have written employment agreements in place to achieve some certainty when terminating employees.  Also, employers should have their employment contracts reviewed by legal counsel periodically because each year there are cases that shed light on how certain wording will be interpreted.  Employment agreements therefore need to be updated periodically to maximize their enforceability and achieve some certainty for terminations.    

Tags

Expertise

Important Notice: The information contained in this Article is intended for general information purposes only and does not create a lawyer-client relationship. It is not intended as legal advice from Harper Grey LLP or the individual author(s), nor intended as a substitute for legal advice on any specific subject matter. Detailed legal counsel should be sought prior to undertaking any legal matter. The information contained in this Article is current to the last update and may change. Last Update: May 15, 2023.

©Harper Grey LLP 2023

 

Related

New benchmark for damages for injury to dignity for sexual harassment
New benchmark for damages for injury to dignity for sexual harassment New benchmark for damages for injury to dignity for sexual harassment
Damages Awarded Under Intimate Images Act
Damages Awarded Under Intimate Images Act Damages Awarded Under Intimate Images Act
Retail Case Update: The Court’s View on Post-Accident Remedial Measures – Are They Determinative of Liability?
Retail Case Update: The Court’s View on Post-Accident Remedial Measures – Are They Determinative of Liability? Retail Case Update: The Court’s View on Post-Accident Remedial Measures – Are They Determinative of Liability? Retail Case Update: The Court’s View on Post-Accident Remedial Measures – Are They Determinative of Liability?
The Dangers of Two Step Offers
The Dangers of Two Step Offers The Dangers of Two Step Offers
Court says federal political parties are subject to BC privacy legislation
Court says federal political parties are subject to BC privacy legislation Court says federal political parties are subject to BC privacy legislation
Court Grants Interim Injunction to Restrain Employees from Competing with their Former Employer
Court Grants Interim Injunction to Restrain Employees from Competing with their Former Employer Court Grants Interim Injunction to Restrain Employees from Competing with their Former Employer
Harper Grey Lawyers complete Mental Health First Aid Certification
Harper Grey Lawyers complete Mental Health First Aid Certification
Defining the Scope of the Cost Recovery Action Under BC’s Environmental Management Act
Defining the Scope of the Cost Recovery Action Under BC’s Environmental Management Act Defining the Scope of the Cost Recovery Action Under BC’s Environmental Management Act Defining the Scope of the Cost Recovery Action Under BC’s Environmental Management Act
Roshni Veerapen elected as Vice Chair of the Health Law Section
Roshni Veerapen elected as Vice Chair of the Health Law Section Roshni Veerapen elected as Vice Chair of the Health Law Section
Court of Appeal finds insurer has duty to defend insured in claim arising from leak of liquid chlorine from its premises despite pollution liability exclusion
Court of Appeal finds insurer has duty to defend insured in claim arising from leak of liquid chlorine from its premises despite pollution liability exclusion Court of Appeal finds insurer has duty to defend insured in claim arising from leak of liquid chlorine from its premises despite pollution liability exclusion Court of Appeal finds insurer has duty to defend insured in claim arising from leak of liquid chlorine from its premises despite pollution liability exclusion
National Indigenous History Month
National Indigenous History Month
Emilie LeDuc appointed to the British Columbia Law Institute Board of Directors
Emilie LeDuc appointed to the British Columbia Law Institute Board of Directors Emilie LeDuc appointed to the British Columbia Law Institute Board of Directors
William Clark and Kara Hill present at the 2024 Self Governing Professions CLE
William Clark and Kara Hill present at the 2024 Self Governing Professions CLE William Clark and Kara Hill present at the 2024 Self Governing Professions CLE William Clark and Kara Hill present at the 2024 Self Governing Professions CLE
A party’s deliberate decision not to attend a hearing does not render that hearing procedurally unfair
A party’s deliberate decision not to attend a hearing does not render that hearing procedurally unfair A party’s deliberate decision not to attend a hearing does not render that hearing procedurally unfair
Harper Grey’s New Website Recognized by Hermes Creative Platinum Website Award
Harper Grey’s New Website Recognized by Hermes Creative Platinum Website Award
arrow icon

Subscribe